Starstuff (what we're made of)

weareallmedie:

firedanceryote:

reptila-tequila:

qeilla:

thefreckledavantgardegoober:

mysticmisfit89:

Meanwhile, in prehistoric Canada…..

No no, you don’t understand, moose really do get that big. Take it from a Canadian. I’ve seen that bullshit in person. Scary as all heck.

And that’s how people can die if they hit a moose. Seriously, one of our fears when driving in the country is having to deal with this scenario of a moose jumping out in front of the car.

moose are actual legit ice age megafauna; theyve been here since the ice age, they are old as fuck. they also are pretty terrifying and ive echoed this before but i went to wiki and “In terms of raw numbers, they attack more people than bears and wolves combined” and “ In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.”

like, fuck off with that

I was dog sitting a dog once who insisted she had to go out in the middle of the night it was an emergency, so I took her out. Suddenly she starts pointing and barking and I look up and can just make out the outline of a HUGE moose. I’ve been accidentally face to face with a black bear and that scared me less than being up close with a moose. I’m 5 foot so imagine staring up at an animal several feet taller than you that is debating charging the dog who’s leash you are holding. I was terrified as I grabbed the dog by her collar to get better control over her and backed up slowly til I was out of line of sight and bolted for the house at a dead run. Did you know most Canadian lake monster stories come from people seeing moose swimming? They are massive animals.

They are massive and they charge. I get so scared when tourists are all “oh yeah, we got out of the car to get a closer look and, ya’ll have some mighty impressive animals around here.”

Yes, yes we do, and they have mighty tired guardian angels because moose can, and do, charge at people.

I’ve always said that moose hunting season is the one time of the year we’re allowed to fight back.

rhamphotheca:

Root Systems of Prairie Plants
Prairies are often called “the upside-down forest” since the majority of the biomass (the plant parts) of the system is underground (up to 70%). Compass plant and blazing star, stars of the prairie screen, noted in this line drawing of roots, reach 15 feet deep. The different morphology of the root systems works in harmony, with each plant taking advantage of a soil niche, mingling and “shaking hands” with all of the other plants in the soil, as they do above the soil.
(via: Native Prairies Association of Texas‎)
click image to see larger

rhamphotheca:

Root Systems of Prairie Plants

Prairies are often called “the upside-down forest” since the majority of the biomass (the plant parts) of the system is underground (up to 70%). Compass plant and blazing star, stars of the prairie screen, noted in this line drawing of roots, reach 15 feet deep. The different morphology of the root systems works in harmony, with each plant taking advantage of a soil niche, mingling and “shaking hands” with all of the other plants in the soil, as they do above the soil.

(via: Native Prairies Association of Texas)

click image to see larger

dduane:

brilliantpanda:

pie-impala-and-rocknroll:

I should probably go to sleep…

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I should probably-

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I should-

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Fuck it.

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just accept your fate…

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Ah God, so true.

This works perfectly fine in paper OR e-form…..

In India, women feel at home in engineering. One 2013 study of Indian engineering students asked whether they ever felt left out in an academic setting. About 8 percent of female engineers reported such feelings, while almost 20 percent of male engineers sometimes felt left out. In another study, female students described the culture of computing as one that prizes meticulousness, intelligence, sociability, and mutual assistance. In workplace interviews with both sexes, sociologist Winifred Poster found “a pervasive conviction that women and men have similar mental abilities to do technical work” and so “an assumption that technical work itself has no gender.”

teacupdream:

kriatyrr:

backyarditarian:

widdershinsgirl:

ohgodhesloose:

cheskamouse:

jasoncanty01:

brightcopperpenny:

superpunch2:

Female pilots edited out of the Star Wars movies.

I saw the tweets about this today, and I was like oh yeah, I remember hearing about that.

And then I saw the pictures and just— wow. What it would have meant to have these women in the movie, all this time. I can’t properly articulate it but it’s hitting me unexpectedly hard.

Wow thats a shame, even a nice old lady too.  These Space Valkyries  should have been left in.

They really should have.

ADSVFISIDCNCIDSVHIUEFUHFIDHuvririahfuwvrui4m8ywmu36 8hthfahuiharahfiargnihiurhurhaigoznifrbogirifrbgorbzo154+849848e54645w8va0

WHAT.

THE.

FUCK.

I lived, ate, and breathed Star Wars from age 2 until 2005 when RotS finally beat the enthusiasm out of me, and I have NEVER, EVER in all my reading on behind-the-scenes and makings-of heard of these shots. It’s a shame there was no relaunched edit of the original trilogy they could have slipped these in OH FUCKING WAIT THERE’S BEEN LIKE 3 OF THOSE NOW.

Fuck. FUCK. Whoever decided to edit out and bury these needs to french kiss an angle grinder.

I want to see the old lady in the A-Wing. Seriously, it’s like, she’s somebody’s grandma. Some kid in the Outer Rim Territories got greased by the Empire for seeing something she wasn’t supposed to see, and her grandma, the bush pilot, decided “Fuck this, I’m gonna strap on an fighter and make the Empire fucking PAY for the moment it decided to fuck with MY FAMILY.”

DON’T. MESS. WITH. GRANDMA.

These are quickly being put into the “always reblog” category.

Whenever there is a war, there are women who are warriors. Then they get erased from history. Happens in real wars and fictional ones alike.

I think the worst part is that there seems to be NO FUCKING REASON.  I mean, not that there would ever be a reason that would satisfactorily justify cutting out every female presence in the wing.  But no botched shots, whatever, that would even try and explain it.  FUCK YOU ALL.

After all the different versions of the movies that exist, can we not pleaaaase get one with these put in!

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”
"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”

"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

…the older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious.
Sophie Heawood  (via brosetta-stone)
cybermax:

future-punk:

Eruption of Mount Tavurvur

I like the fact that you can see the shockwave go through the clouds.

cybermax:

future-punk:

Eruption of Mount Tavurvur

I like the fact that you can see the shockwave go through the clouds.

acornfarm:

defilerwyrm:

AHAHAHA NOT QUITE, OP, NOT QUITE


FUCKING NAILED IT

acornfarm:

defilerwyrm:

AHAHAHA NOT QUITE, OP, NOT QUITE

FUCKING NAILED IT

programmerdad:

sperari